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“The Internet in America”—Your YouTube Interview with FCC Chairman Julius Genachowski

March 10th, 2010 by Haley Van Dÿck - FCC New Media

This Tuesday, the Federal Communications Commission will unveil the National Broadband Plan—a roadmap to connect all Americans to affordable, high-speed internet.

The development of the National Broadband Plan has been one of the most open and participatory processes in the history of the FCC, with citizens from all over the country participating in our online workshops, sharing their ideas on our crowd sourcing platforms, and joining the discussion on our blog.
 
We’ve reached out over the past few months and asked questions about what broadband means to you and your community. Now it’s your turn to ask FCC Chairman Julius Genachowski questions about his plan for the future of the broadband in America. No topic is off-limits: from civic engagement to economic opportunity, education to health care – we want to know what Americans have in mind for Internet innovation in the 21st century.
 
Following the announcement of the National Broadband Plan next Tuesday, YouTube will interview Chairman Genachowski as part of a series of in-person interviews with government leaders answering your questions. Check out the latest You Tube Interview with President Obama here.
 
Join the discussion at Citizen Tube and submit your question for Chairman Genachowski via Google Moderator today.  You can also vote on the best questions in any of seven topic areas:
 
The deadline for questions is Sunday evening at midnight on the west coast. 
 
On Tuesday, March 16th following the FCC’s Open Commission Meeting, Steve Grove of YouTube will ask Chairman Genachowski your questions.  We look forward to hearing from you.

 

6 Responses to ““The Internet in America”—Your YouTube Interview with FCC Chairman Julius Genachowski”

  1. Guest says:

    I live out in the county (about 5 miles out from Marysville Ohio, away from Cable, DSL or radio internet) and can only use cell phone internet ( 5 gig limit losts of $ after 5 gigs) or I have to pay tons of money on Satellite Internet, which is very very very slow, not real time ( Ping of 1000), can’t even watch you tube with out pauses skips and fails. Can’t work from home, can’t surf the internet if we have cloud cover, or if the down beam in Texas has cloud cover. You only are allowed a 10gig limit in a 30day rolling period and after you reach 70% of 10gigs of your limit is throttled down and even a simple page like goggle will time out. It’s a scam and I pay 69.00 a month for it ( Direct TV / wild Blue ). I used to live in the city of Columbus Ohio and was able to live a normal internet life, now I’m stuck with the option of going days, weeks with out using the internet and the cost is twice as much. My neighbors and I are all stuck.

  2. No options but slow and lots of $ says:

    I live out in the county (about 5 miles out from Marysville Ohio, away from Cable, DSL or radio internet) and can only use cell phone internet ( 5 gig limit losts of $ after 5 gigs) or I have to pay tons of money on Satellite Internet, which is very very very slow, not real time ( Ping of 1000), can’t even watch you tube with out pauses skips and fails. Can’t work from home, can’t surf the internet if we have cloud cover, or if the down beam in Texas has cloud cover. You only are allowed a 10gig limit in a 30day rolling period and after you reach 70% of 10gigs of your limit is throttled down and even a simple page like goggle will time out. It’s a scam and I pay 69.00 a month for it ( Direct TV / wild Blue ). I used to live in the city of Columbus Ohio and was able to live a normal internet life, now I’m stuck with the option of going days, weeks with out using the internet and the cost is twice as much. My neighbors and I are all stuck.

  3. Rachel says:

    What are you doing to ensure that companies like Google aren't given an unfair advantage in how this discussion takes shape and how ensuing policies are then formed?

  4. Citizen says:

    Given that Google is a party to several proceedings before the Commission, is lobbying the Commission heavily, and has a large stake in the outcome of the Commission's actions, is it appropriate for Google/YouTube to vet the questions for an interview with the Chairman? Will it select leading questions that support its corporate agendas? And will it refuse to ask questions which relate to its own questionable practices (for example, blocking Google Voice calls to certain numbers)?

  5. Brett Glass says:

    "No options," like many folks you may be laboring under the misconception that only cable and telephone companies provide Internet. How about a wireless ISP? Jenco Wireless, a WISP, covers most of your county. See http://www.jencospeedweb.com/service.htm.

  6. Guest says:

    Given that Google is a party to several proceedings before the Commission.
    http://youtubedownloadtool.blogspot.com/

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