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The National Broadband Map

February 18th, 2011 by Anne Neville - Director, State Broadband Initiative – NTIA

Welcome to the first-ever public, searchable nationwide map of broadband access. 

The National Broadband Map is an unprecedented project created by NTIA, in collaboration with the FCC, and in partnership with each state, territory and the District of Columbia. We created the map at the direction of Congress, which recognized that economic opportunities are driven by access to 21st Century infrastructure.

With funding from NTIA’s State Broadband Data & Development Program, our state partners have gathered and worked to validate broadband data from thousands of providers across the country. Together, we developed a dataset and website that includes more than 25 million searchable records displaying where broadband Internet service is available, the technology used to provide the service, the maximum advertised speeds of the service, and the names of the broadband providers. Whether you are a consumer seeking more information on the broadband options available to you, a researcher or policymaker working to spur greater broadband deployment, a local official aiming to attract investment in your community, or an application developer with innovative ideas, the National Broadband Map can help.  And if you don’t find the answer you’re looking for on the map itself, you can download the entire dataset.



While the launch of this map is a huge accomplishment, today is just the beginning. Our partners in the states are working to expand and update this important dataset, and we will update the map with new data every six months. In the meantime, you can help. Each time you search the map, you have the opportunity to tell us about the data you’re seeing. This crowdsourced feedback will be an important tool to improve and refine the data.

We invite you to explore the many features and functionalities the National Broadband Map offers. To start, search for broadband by address. Or go straight to our analysis tools and compare one area to others, and make sure you spend some time with our maps.  Want more? Download the dataset, use our APIs and please tell us how you’re using the data.

We expect the map will be a valuable tool as we work to bridge the technological divide, expand economic opportunities, and leverage the power of broadband to address many of the nation’s most pressing challenges.  We hope you will make full use of its capabilities and let us know what you think and how we can improve.

14 Responses to “The National Broadband Map”

  1. Guest says:

    Only one problem with the map; I'm still on a dial up connection that averages 21k and your map won't load, apparently because it's too huge. The server seems to time out before the page gets much of anything loaded. So, I guess in order to access the map to see if you CAN get broadband, you already have to have broadband to be able to load the map in full. Would seem to defeat the purpose, no? So I'm not sure how those of us still on dial up are supposed to check the data and give you feedback when we can't even load the thing. I guess it's the same as always....those WITH broadband get to say how they need even faster broadband while those of us forced to use dial up have to sit and watch them speed away from us because our voices are not heard.

  2. Cynthia Doroff says:

    9994 County Road 23
    Brainerd, MN 56401
    c.l.boots@att.net

    I have checked the map and found out that I am eligable for broadband with QWEST.
    I am not, I am unable to get any broadband service with QWEST, ALONG WITH MANY OTHERS IN MY AREA. I have been trying for the last 3 years, calling all the time to try and get broadband in my area. It's less than a mile away!!!!!!!
    I called QWEST and informed them that they gave the wrong info to the GOV. They told me it was the map makers fault and would do nothing about it.

    Can someone let me know what's going on with QWEST. Other companies say they have a lock on this are and cannot serve people here???? Is this true? Is the FCC letting them do this???

    VERY Frustrated, Cynthia

  3. Guest says:

    map needs work. it isn't bright enough, doesn't enlarge, etc. definately needs work.

  4. Person in Phelan Ca says:

    I looked up my address and it says I am able to get DSL from 1.5 to 3Mbps but when I go on the Verizon Site and check there is nothing for DSL all they offer is Dial-up. My House is next to a Fiber trunk like and I can't use any of it because I am not zoned for it. When People who have moved and cancelled there DSL Verizon is not reopening the slot. There has been no DSL available since Oct 09 and Verizon has done nothing to even add more DSL, I have heard that Verizon is suggesting there 3G but think for a Main Internet connection that would not work.

    It is saying I can get 50-100Mbps and that would be Verizon FiOS but it says I can't get it. It says FiOS is not available at your location, High Speed Internet isn’t available at your address.

    The Stuff I do I can't use Satellite internet because it can't do RealTime functions so I am on 3G that barely reaches 50 or 100Kbps and I can't affored it

    Why don't you have a thing were people can send a email to help correct the info

  5. Tamara Poling says:

    I find it frustrating that I lived in Dumas, MS (middle of nowhere) and was able to have high speed internet and now living just outside (3 miles) Columbia City, IN we are now on dial-up. I know some of my neighbors are on OpenRange Communications wireless broadband internet. I have been calling this company for almost 6 months just to be told there is nothing available. People out here have moved out and I know they were using OpenRange but of course, we are still not able to have service. I have informed the CSR on the phone each time I call that people have moved out and they HAD the service but I am still told "we do not offer our service in your area. Call back in a month to see if anything has changed." So here we are with the option of either dial-up or satellite internet because we live in a rural area. I can't afford to pay the outrageous prices for satellite

    I tried to look at this map to see if there is any broadband coverage in my area but, as with other people here, I can not see the map because it won't load due to a slow connection. I don't know why I'm surprised that I can not see it. It seems that everyone is always worried about the next new, best thing and completely forget about "the little guys" that are still forced to use last century technology.

    It's no secret that all companies think of ways to bring in more money. All the decision makers think of ways to improve their company's technology and make it faster to attract their current customers and potential urban customers to upgrade their service. If those people would just think about expanding to the rural areas to an entire new market of people that are fed up with dial-up or satellite service, their customer base and income would grow exponentially!

    I will now step off the soap box.

  6. Guest says:

    When will the winter 2010 BIP Round 2 Awards be rewarded? Why is it we cannot find any information in regards to this? Also alot of people here are right the Maps are way off and I would suggest if you truly want the correct information then send out a postcard asking the individuals to reply with what they do have availalble and put some people to work to enter that data and create a true map.

  7. Guest says:

    How does one update this map. It is not accurate. In Massachusetts Barnstable county, we do not have 100% served.

    I would like to provide "better' data to ther group that is responsible for the map.

    Mike Forgione
    Truro Cable Advisory Committee

  8. Eli says:

    I think this is great idea to put it out there in the open like this (and measure progress over time), however, the problem exists that the companies providing information of their coverage are perhaps "fluffing" (the truth about) their coverage-- not necessarily on purpose, of course, but the main point being: the map is not accurate, ESPECIALLY in (take a guess) RURAL AREAS! I would suggest to others to report if such-and-such ISP is NOT available in your area. Hopefully, this will help to correct the map... by which time we will realize, it's going to take more work to bring broadband to all America than anyone thought- simply because the data we had wasn't accurate.

  9. Don Samuelson says:

    How are you expecting BTOP CCI awardees to use this data to help create a current baseline against which future economic and social impacts can be measured?
    Don Samuelson
    DSSA310@aol.com
    847-420-1732

  10. Volvo Dealers says:

    Only one problem with the map; I'm still on a dial up connection that averages 21k and your map won't load, apparently because it's too huge. The server seems to time out before the page gets much of anything loaded. So, I guess in order to access the map to see if you CAN get broadband, you already have to have broadband to be able to load the map in full. Would seem to defeat the purpose, no? So I'm not sure how those of us still on dial up are supposed to check the data and give you feedback when we can't even load the thing. I guess it's the same as always.<a href="www.volvo-dealers.com" title=".">.</a>.those WITH broadband get to say how they need even faster broadband while those of us forced to use dial up have to sit and watch them speed away from us because our voices are not heard.

  11. Guest says:

    My address shows I should be getting both AT&T dsl and charter cable. I can get neither. Is there a way to officially report that this is wrong?

  12. rerickson says:

    It would have been nice to see a map of broadband availability before the 7.2 billion in grants were awarded. I believe we will see more duplicate networks than true broadband expansion to the unserved areas.

  13. Guest says:

    The link to download the dataset doesn't seem to work.

  14. Guest says:

    I have a low-speed broadband (DSL) connection and even with that find this map unusable. Too many items to load, takes minutes for every zoom in or out or reposition. Every reposition or zoom in or out seems to load at least 300 items. Need at least 1mb/sec for this to be of any use at all and our community just doesn't have that kind of speed available. (Note to self, Gov't - many third world countries have better access.) So, to add to what the first guest reply says, even some broadband connections aren't fast enough to use this tool.

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