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Stakeholder Meetings

June 22nd, 2010 by Edward Lazarus - Chief of Staff

Since the D.C. Circuit’s decision in the Comcast Internet-discrimination case more than two months ago, there has been a vibrant debate among stakeholders from all parts of the broadband community on the best path forward. Some stakeholders have shared their ideas with staff at the Commission, including ideas for legislative options. Senior Commission staff are making themselves available to meet with all interested parties on these issues. To the extent stakeholders discuss proposals with Commission staff regarding other approaches outside of the open proceedings at the Commission, the agency’s ex parte disclosure requirements are not applicable. But to promote transparency and keep the public informed, we will post notices of these meetings here at blog.broadband.gov. As always, our door is open to all ideas and all stakeholders.

Ex Parte Meeting Notices:
June 22, 2010 - Dish Network Corporation
June 22, 2010 - Alcatel-Lucent
June 23, 2010 - Dish Network Corporation
June 22 and 23, 2010 - Open Internet Coalition
June 23, 2010 - Open Internet Coalition
June 24, 2010 - Dish Network Corporation
June 24, 2010 - Motion Picture Association of America, Inc
June 24, 2010 - Open Internet Coalition
June 24, 2010 - AT&T Services, Inc
June 24, 2010 - Time Warner Cable
June 29, 2010 - Sprint Nextel Corporation
June 29, 2010 - Center for Democracy & Technology (CDT)
June 29, 2010 - XO Communications
June 29, 2010 - PAETEC
June 30, 2010 - Public Knowledge
July 1, 2010 - Center for Democracy & Technology (CDT)
July 1, 2010 - Dish Network Corporation
July 1, 2010 - Office of Engineering and Technology, FCC
July 2, 2010 - Tekelec
July 2, 2010 - American Cable Association
July 2, 2010 - American Cable Association
July 2, 2010 - American Cable Association
July 2, 2010 - American Cable Association
July 2, 2010 - Free Press
July 6, 2010 - Leap Wireless International, Inc
July 7, 2010 - US Telecom Association
July 8, 2010 - Consumers Union
July 8, 2010 - Writers Guild of America, West
July 8, 2010 - American Cable Association
July 12, 2010 - Open Internet Coalition
July 13, 2010 - XO Communications, LLC
July 14, 2010 - National Cable & Telecommunications Association
July 14, 2010 - Google, Inc
July 15, 2010 - T-Mobile USA, Inc
July 16, 2010 - T-Mobile USA, Inc
July 19, 2010 - National Cable & Telecommunications Association
July 19, 2010 - Motion Picture Association of America, Inc
July 20, 2010 - T-Mobile USA, Inc
July 20, 2010 - CTIA - The Wireless Association
July 20, 2010 - Leap Wireless International, Inc
July 21, 2010 - Leap Wireless International, Inc
July 21, 2010 - Media Access Project
July 21, 2010 - AT&T Inc
July 22, 2010 - Center for Democracy and Technology (CDT)
July 22, 2010 - Free Press
July 22, 2010 - Free Press
July 22, 2010 - Clearwire Corporation
July 23, 2010 - Skype Communications S.A.R.L.
July 23, 2010 - National Center for Missing & Exploited Children
July 23, 2010 - Andrew Jay Schwartzman
July 26, 2010 - Skype Communications S.A.R.L.
July 26, 2010 - National Association of Regulatory Utility Commissioners
July 27, 2010 - ALA, ARL and EDUCAUSE
July 28, 2010 - AT&T, Inc
July 28, 2010 - Computer & Communications Industry Association
July 29, 2010 - Open Internet Coalition
July 29, 2010 - Open Internet Coalition
August 1, 2010 - Recording Industry Association of America
August 2, 2010 - Open Internet Coalition
August 2, 2010 - Windstream Communications, Inc
August 2, 2010 - Open Technology Initiative
August 2, 2010 - Public Knowledge
August 2, 2010 - Stanford Law School
August 4, 2010 - Verizon
August 5, 2010 - National Cable & Telecommunications Association
August 6, 2010 - Telepoly Consulting

The Record Is Clear: America Needs More Spectrum

April 8th, 2010 by Edward Lazarus - Chief of Staff

Many have noted recent comments by the CEO of Verizon Ivan Seidenberg casting doubt on the need to allocate additional spectrum for mobile broadband, a key recommendation in the National Broadband Plan.

The FCC based the spectrum recommendations in the National Broadband Plan on the public record generated by an unprecedented open and participatory process.

That’s why the recent statements by Verizon’s CEO are rather baffling. The fact is, Verizon played a major role in building an overwhelming record in support of more mobile broadband spectrum, consistently expressing its official view that the country faces a looming spectrum crisis that could undermine the country’s global competitiveness.

Verizon’s advocacy began as early as June 9, 2009, where their filing stated:

“Verizon Wireless believes it is vitally important for the federal government to identify spectrum bands that can be reallocated for future broadband use. Any policy or strategy to promote broadband access to acknowledge the need for more spectrum in order to meet the growing demand for wireless broadband.”

“The government has the responsibility to identify and license spectrum to serve the public interest.”

“Verizon Wireless believes that a more important goal of any spectrum inventory should be to identify any underused spectrum that can be repurposed to auction for broadband use.”

Verizon’s push for more mobile broadband spectrum continued in a September 30, 2009 filing, which notes:

“The Commission has identified only 50 megahertz of additional spectrum for next generation wireless growth. This total lags behind both the United States’ competitor nations as well as the ever increasing demand for mobile broadband services. Verizon Wireless therefore urges the Commission to undertake a targeted examination of spectrum to identify additional bands.”

“Recognizing that ‘the world is at the precipice of the full scale convergence of two powerful and sweeping forces: wireless mobility and broadband internet access,’ numerous studies have analyzed the growing market for mobile broadband and concluded that significant additional spectrum must be allocated in order to keep up with demand and changing technologies. These studies make clear the urgency with which the Commission must act to identify and allocate additional spectrum for wireless services in order to maintain and promote innovation.”

Indeed, the need for more spectrum is well documented in the many studies submitted into National Broadband Plan record. According to Cisco, North American wireless networks carried an amount of data equivalent to 1,700 Libraries of Congress. By 2014, Cisco projects wireless networks in North America will experience more than a 40-fold increase in data traffic.

Participating in a National Broadband Plan workshop on spectrum, Bill Stone, Executive Director of Network Strategy for Verizon Wireless noted that the company has recently experienced substantial data growth in its network and would need more spectrum in the coming years:

“I'll say in the five-plus year timeframe, I'd like to have north of -- I'd like to be in a position where I could acquire north of 100 megahertz.”

Even as recently December 2, 2009, Verizon Wireless, along with nearly 100 other leading companies from across the broadband ecosystem, sent a letter to Commission offering their help in pursuing more spectrum for mobile broadband:

“Our nation’s ability to lead the world in innovation and technology is threatened by the lack of sufficient spectrum for wireless broadband applications and services. As the chairman has said, there is a looming spectrum crisis. We applaud your candid acknowledgement of this fact and appreciate your efforts to close the spectrum gap.”

“Without more spectrum, America’s global leadership in innovation and technology is threatened. The undersigned urge you to allocate more spectrum for wireless broadband as soon as possible. Please let us know how we can help.”

Moreover, the wireless industry’s trade association (CTIA -- of which Verizon is a member) called for 800 Mhz of spectrum for mobile broadband -- 300 Mhz more spectrum more than the Plan recommended -- to address the looming spectrum crunch.

As the U.S. Department of Justice (DOJ) aptly summarized: "Given the potential of wireless services to reach underserved areas and to provide an alternative to wireline broadband providers in other areas, the Commission’s primary tool for promoting broadband competition should be freeing up spectrum."

The National Broadband Plan record contains widespread agreement and a solid foundation of factual evidence on the need for the FCC to pursue policies that would free up 500 Mhz for mobile broadband by 2020.

We hope to work with Verizon and other companies across the communications sector on ways to achieve the important goal of ensuring that the United States has world-leading mobile broadband infrastructure.



Capture The Phone Numbers Using Your Camera Phone

If you have a camera and a 2D matrix code reader on your mobile phone, you can capture the FCC Phone numbers right to your phone by following these three easy steps:
Step 1: Take a photograph of one of the codes below using the camera on your mobile phone.
Step 2: Use your phone's Datamatrix or QR Code reader to decode the information on the photograph. Please note, these code readers are device specific and are available to download on the internet.
Step 3: Store the decoded address information to your phone's address book and use it with your Maps or GPS application.

Datamatrix and QR FCC Phones